Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi! My name is Ruben Bañuelos and I'm lead content creator at Draco Studios and the creator of the Draconic Language that will be used in Dragons of the Red Moon and other projects related to Dragonbond. Please feel free to use this forum to discuss and translate the Draconic Poem. I'll be hanging around to see how well are you doing and drop an ocassional clue.

 

Just as a reminder, this is the original poem. (As transcribed by a poor soul trapped on the Red Moon)

 

 

U shêfqmirena bakharut vkr’ad

tshêmurut ka je tsalkokhr

khrashafqa vkrute vaernure uvrakezhi nüli

Zal ermuteni alaureni thsêmur’ad ka palfrekutim la’azarutim nurim

Zherani fenmelutani vkrani u trümena

Drakhuta valerna va’narezhi tshêbazherel nurel korvim

Drakhal gimbesha vazera sêkhera zanel, drakera nurezutera nurel

Merra bazherezutera Rubiksokhr, Sêkhera Verim

Kadmos, tsalkesuta, zhardesh tsemutekhram feksekhram.

Sejut shermat’ad bamra Shermatatzja tsalkesh umeth

Vazeni vorfrekeni ka baza feksa umkazesh ukharekhram zhurani trümani;

Vaze ummirave umesh vo’odekhre tli ekhreth zhurrel a’asthrrel umenel

Ka u zher’ad shermat’ad vaz va’umrakesh, gre khmuresh gre umrakesh malfeksut’ad al’ad,

vem mres gimbesha uvumetes. Tshênaumre ukskezhi, tshênaumre eruksketlen

ka ard vaza güra va’uvumesh. Zana va’uvrakezhi sua erkazhena trümverani drakerim,

vornare sua mrena Kadmos va’zekhezhi,

khrivaksa vkrim, ka ksüv’kare belut’ad v’kar’ad fenfeks’ad

ka vokh…

U shêfqmirena bakhar vkr’ad

tshêmurut ka je tsalkokhr

khrashafqa vkrute vaernure uvrakezhi nüli

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So... here comes the first clue

This language is inspired in Russian, German, Spanish, and Latin. Three of those languages share a meaningful feature that is present in draconic. Can you guess which?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Ruben said:

So... here comes the first clue

This language is inspired in Russian, German, Spanish, and Latin. Three of those languages share a meaningful feature that is present in draconic. Can you guess which?

 

I want to say nominal cases for German and Russian, but considering the other two... verb conjugations, maybe?
Or possibly words that use prefixes and suffixes (composites) to change its meaning slightly? 

On another note - I really like this way of engaging people with the project and can't wait to see how it keeps going! 🙂 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Hilasar said:

I want to say nominal cases for German and Russian, but considering the other two... verb conjugations, maybe?
Or possibly words that use prefixes and suffixes (composites) to change its meaning slightly? 

On another note - I really like this way of engaging people with the project and can't wait to see how it keeps going! 🙂 

 

Wow, that was fast. Latin has also nominal cases. So yes, you got it right. As a language, draconic uses 5 different grammatical cases. I bet you can guess at least four of them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Ruben said:

Wow, that was fast. Latin has also nominal cases. So yes, you got it right. As a language, draconic uses 5 different grammatical cases. I bet you can guess at least four of them.

Oh, great! I wasn't completely sure about Spanish and Latin! I'd guess the first four would be Nominative, Accusative, Dative and Genitive... and I'll guess Prepositional for the last one from Russian! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, madmaxthe7th said:

I'll guess the 5th one as instrumental seeing as this is a song right, I am guessing thats not what it's for but I have a good feeling about it.

The song part has actually something to do with the missing case, but in a different way.

Just to review:

German has four cases: Nominative, Genitive, Dative and Accusative

For Russian, you have the same four, plus instrumental and prepositional

And for latin, you also have those four plus ablative and vocative

So... try and think like dragons, which five cases would you use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Ruben said:

The song part has actually something to do with the missing case, but in a different way.

Just to review:

German has four cases: Nominative, Genitive, Dative and Accusative

For Russian, you have the same four, plus instrumental and prepositional

And for latin, you also have those four plus ablative and vocative

So... try and think like dragons, which five cases would you use?

I almost want to say vocative is one of them, even though I am not completely familiar with Latin... and may stick with the four basic ones from German and all the others for grammatical reasons, but I do want to take a longer look!

I also believe that -im, -ani and -esh (or -kesh) indicate some of the cases. Does capitalization play an important role in this as well other than proper names? 

Another guess would be that Drak has to do with Dragon and trüm reminds me of dream in German (traum), but it's just wild guesses! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Hilasar said:

I almost want to say vocative is one of them, even though I am not completely familiar with Latin... and may stick with the four basic ones from German and all the others for grammatical reasons, but I do want to take a longer look!

I also believe that -im, -ani and -esh (or -kesh) indicate some of the cases. Does capitalization play an important role in this as well other than proper names? 

Another guess would be that Drak has to do with Dragon and trüm reminds me of dream in German (traum), but it's just wild guesses! 

Those are fairly great observations.

I can confirm that capitalization applies only to proper nouns.

And don't be scared to take wild guesses. You might hit closer to home than you think😉

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Ruben said:

Those are fairly great observations.

I can confirm that capitalization applies only to proper nouns.

And don't be scared to take wild guesses. You might hit closer to home than you think😉

Ah, lovely! 😀

Got through a couple of stories as well, and Kadmos is the name of the first dragon and Drakha is the name of the world (right...?). So I'm guessing Drakhuta and Drakhal might be Drakha in some case other than nominal? Or possibly the name of the world comes from the word dragon in Draconic as well? There is 'drak' without the 'h' in the end (drakerim) and without capitalization after all. (This is fun!! 😋)
 

Edited by Hilasar
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Hilasar said:

Ah, lovely! 😀

Got through a couple of stories as well, and Kadmos is the name of the first dragon and Drakha is the name of the world (right...?). So I'm guessing Drakhuta and Drakhal might be Drakha in some case other than nominal? Or possibly the name of the world comes from the word dragon in Draconic as well? (This is fun!! 😋)
 

Drakha is the name of the world and those words are other cases. You are doing pretty well.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Ruben said:

Drakha is the name of the world and those words are other cases. You are doing pretty well.

Thank you! I really love this kind of stuff. 😀

Another wild guess: does 'Rubik' ("Rubiksokhr") have to do with the Red Moon in the project name, maybe? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Hilasar said:

Thank you! I really love this kind of stuff. 😀

Another wild guess: does 'Rubik' ("Rubiksokhr") have to do with the Red Moon in the project name, maybe? 

Not really, but take a close look at the way you are splitting the radical of the word from the ending. Specially when comparing it to other words. On the draco studios twitter account we'll be publishing shot phrases and their translation that we think will be really helpful piecing this together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, madmaxthe7th said:

drakerim too miesed that one.

Correct! there are different endings to the words and they contain clues about the role they fulfill in the sentence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Ruben said:

Not really, but take a close look at the way you are splitting the radical of the word from the ending. Specially when comparing it to other words. On the draco studios twitter account we'll be publishing shot phrases and their translation that we think will be really helpful piecing this together.

Got it! I did see the ending on a few others. It was a wild guess from the Latin 'rubrum' but worth a shot. I just realized I wasn't following on Twitter yet and corrected that! 😀

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U shêfqmirena bakhar vkr’ad

starts the song and apreas near the end of the song, I think this a good line to crack first.

Edited by madmaxthe7th
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, madmaxthe7th said:

U shêfqmirena bakhar vkr’ad

starts the song and apreas near the end of the song, I think this a good line to crack first.

Yep! The first three lines repeat in the end of the song.

So from Twitter, Evera seems to mean 'man' and -im apparently is the Genitive ending. I believe 'umezhi' is the verb since the ending appears a few times in places where it would make sense for verbs to be. Will be working a bit more on that song tomorrow! 😄

Edited by Hilasar
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hilasar said:

Yep! The first three lines repeat in the end of the song.

So from Twitter, Evera seems to mean 'man' and -im apparently is the Genitive ending. I believe 'umezhi' is the verb since the ending appears a few times in places where it would make sense for verbs to be. Will be working a bit more on that song tomorrow! 😄

So far, so good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'll join the fray. Here is what I have so far based on things Ruben has confirmed, the first Twitter clue, and notes from Hilasar and Madmax.

Capitalization = proper nouns (confirmed by Ruben)

Kadmos = proper name (confirmed by Ruben), the first dragon in existence (sourced from campaign page)

Drakha = world name (confirmed by Ruben), the Red Moon, being in truth a Dralorian misnomer for the planet of Drakha, is the residence to the Great Wyrms. (sourced from campaign page)

Drakhuta, Drakhal, Drakerim = other cases, ending determines role in the sentence

Evera umezhi everim reksa = "A man is a man’s wolf" (Twitter Clue #1)

Evera = man (singular noun), hence -im would be the possessive ending

-im = -‘s (Genitive or possessive ending)

reksha = wolf (singular noun)

-a = singular noun, as seen in Drahka, Drakhuta and a LOT throughout the poem

umezhi = verb?

-ezhi appears at 6 times: uvrakezhi (twice)ukskezhi, va’narezhi, va’uvrakezhi, va’zekhezhi

-khr, -khram, -khre, -kreth = presumably another case form as it appears several times at the ends of words, specifically tsalkokhr, Rubiksokhr and tsemutekhram feksekhram , ukharekhramand lastly vo'odekhre, ekhreth

Drakerim -> dragon's? 

Verim = phonetically sounds like Wyrm, so "Sêkhera Verim" could mean "Great Wyrms"

Also spent a little time tinkering with Google Translate, I think I was able to make some headway on some lines in the poem. A lot of the text seems to translate roughly as Bulgarian. However accurate that actually is in this case can probably be debated.

U shêfqmirena bakharut vkr’ad = In the “boss of the boss” vkr’ad (shefqmirena bakharut translated to "boss of the boss" though vkr'ad didn't want to translate well)

 

... that's all I have for now. I'll tinker some more tomorrow at work. For now, goodnight my fellow draco language nerds

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay just kidding, here are a few more things I noticed. Just seems I can't edit my previous post to include them there.

Tshê- = prefix in tshêbazherel, tshênaumre, tshêmurut

Va’- = prefix in va’narezhi, va’umrakesh, va’uvrakezhi, va’zekhezhi; which also appears in several of the words with the -ezhi suffix as noted in bold.
Also noticed uvrakezhi and va’uvrakezhi. Same word just with va'- prefix.

tsalk- = prefix for tsalkokhr, tsalkesuta, tsalkesh; similar to tsar or 'king'

'khram' in Russian means temple, shrine, or sanctuary

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Wardraw said:

I guess I'll join the fray. Here is what I have so far based on things Ruben has confirmed, the first Twitter clue, and notes from Hilasar and Madmax.

Capitalization = proper nouns (confirmed by Ruben)

 

Kadmos = proper name (confirmed by Ruben), the first dragon in existence (sourced from campaign page)

 

Drakha = world name (confirmed by Ruben), the Red Moon, being in truth a Dralorian misnomer for the planet of Drakha, is the residence to the Great Wyrms. (sourced from campaign page)

 

Drakhuta, Drakhal, Drakerim = other cases, ending determines role in the sentence

 

Evera umezhi everim reksa = "A man is a man’s wolf" (Twitter Clue #1)

 

Evera = man (singular noun), hence -im would be the possessive ending

-im = -‘s (Genitive or possessive ending)

 

reksha = wolf (singular noun)

 

-a = singular noun, as seen in Drahka, Drakhuta and a LOT throughout the poem

umezhi = verb?

-ezhi appears at 6 times: uvrakezhi (twice)ukskezhi, va’narezhi, va’uvrakezhi, va’zekhezhi

-khr, -khram, -khre, -kreth = presumably another case form as it appears several times at the ends of words, specifically tsalkokhr, Rubiksokhr and tsemutekhram feksekhram , ukharekhramand lastly vo'odekhre, ekhreth

Drakerim -> dragon's? 

Verim = phonetically sounds like Wyrm, so "Sêkhera Verim" could mean "Great Wyrms"

Also spent a little time tinkering with Google Translate, I think I was able to make some headway on some lines in the poem. A lot of the text seems to translate roughly as Bulgarian. However accurate that actually is in this case can probably be debated.

U shêfqmirena bakharut vkr’ad = In the “boss of the boss” vkr’ad (shefqmirena bakharut translated to "boss of the boss" though vkr'ad didn't want to translate well)

 

... that's all I have for now. I'll tinker some more tomorrow at work. For now, goodnight my fellow draco language nerds

I absolutely love this breakdown. 

Here are some things I can confirm

1) -a is the ending for some type of nouns in nominative case. It is NOT, however, the only ending for nominative nouns. This is for animate nouns

2) -im is the ending for genitive singular for animate nouns

3) umezhi  is indeed a verb

4) both -okhr and -khram correspond to particular declensions

Some additional clues:

Draconic is not based in Bulgarian. I tried for its phonotatics to be unique and something that would sound like the speech of a dragon. I'll share shortly the phonological catalogue in case you are curious about the pronunciation of the words.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Wardraw said:

Okay just kidding, here are a few more things I noticed. Just seems I can't edit my previous post to include them there.

Tshê- = prefix in tshêbazherel, tshênaumre, tshêmurut

 

Va’- = prefix in va’narezhi, va’umrakesh, va’uvrakezhi, va’zekhezhi; which also appears in several of the words with the -ezhi suffix as noted in bold.
Also noticed uvrakezhi and va’uvrakezhi. Same word just with va'- prefix.

tsalk- = prefix for tsalkokhr, tsalkesuta, tsalkesh; similar to tsar or 'king'

'khram' in Russian means temple, shrine, or sanctuary

 

Tshê is a prefix, that's correct. It is also a word on its own, however it is not present on this poem.

Va'- is also a prefix you might note it is only attached to certain kind of words

Tsalk is not prefix, but all those words you have written do share a connection tied to that part of the word

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, let me just say I'm friggin' proud of you guys as a community. This is a complex challenge and you are taking strides towards solving it and that makes me feel like you are one of the best communities we could expect. We just hope the effort and the time we are pouring into this setting makes it worthy of your time.

So, in case you're curious about how does draconic sound like, this document has the phonologic catalogue.

As a side note:

Some of the names of the dragons are meant to be phonetic adaptations of their original names in draconic:

These are some examples

Baastherox - Ba'astheroks

Kuxcoatl - Kuksko'atl

Aureus - Avre'us

Sivax - Sivaks

Dehrilya - Dekhr'lja

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...