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On 4/19/2019 at 7:21 PM, Hilasar said:

Hmm... am I to assume that for proper nouns and pronouns, adjectives don't share noun endings then, if Varezhut means 'grateful' (as in 'we are grateful')? 

I am a little confused with all the new discoveries and will need to take some time to process, but I've liked the clues thus far! 

A clue I can give you here is that I took a lot of how adjectives/adverbs work form the german language.

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On 4/19/2019 at 7:42 PM, Hilasar said:

Wait, question: which one of the two are correct about the 'in depth' translation? It's been confirmed that -okhr is an ending for accusative on previous posts, but here Allinor says dative for zal fenena...

And also that 'mrokhr' means 'what', which is similar to 'umrokhr'. Does draconic have double negation, by any chance? 

 


 

It seems I made a mistake there, both are meant to be dative. (I guess I'll have to double-check the clues I've written so far to ensure this doesn't happen again.

Regarding mrokhr and umrokhr, these two are very similar, but not quite. I kind of took inspiration from russian regarding how these two work, but it's not that straight forward. Think of it as two words

u-mrokhr

That should be enough to point you in the right direction I guess.

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On 4/19/2019 at 8:17 PM, Allinor said:

if -eth makes the infinitive, maybe -ut makes the participle?

That's pretty close. Though there is no participle in draconic, -ut works as a participle in the sense that it can turn verbs to adjectives.

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9 hours ago, Hilasar said:

Hiya, @Ruben

 

Haven't been online much in the last few days for a few reasons, but I wanted to get back to the dragons and, gathering the last few clues, I wanted to ask about a few thoughts.

About the -ut ending - Is it an adjective ending that also includes a 'to be' verb, used instead of umeth whenever an adjective is attached to a noun? The very first two lines seem to me that either this is the case, or that there aren't any verbs in them. 'Varezhut' would make sense as (we are) grateful. I might be terribly wrong!

I think that at this point it's safe to say that vkr+ending means all, mkr+ending means what, bamre is when in a previous clue and I'd guess bamra means time.

 

I believe that 'tshêgerakh' (lack, or not-have) is a combination of the negative and the verb 'to have', and gerakh, to have.

-okhr is the accusative singular for inanimate nouns.

-ena is the dative singular for inanimate nouns.

-esh seems to be the (or a kind of) past form of verbs.

 

The following ones I'm not completely sure about:

-eni is the nominative for inanimate, plural?

-eri is the dative for animate, plural?

-rir is the dative for animate singular?

No worries, been unable to check this as often myself.

About vkr- and bamr- you are mostly right. Notice mr- in and on itself is a particle. The prefixes and suffixes change its specific meaning.

you are right abourt thsêgarakh, or its infinitive form, gareth.

You are right about all six endings you are mentioning with the only difference that the ending for dative animate singular is -ir

 

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Another random guess, but if Mire relates to the concept of vision, and ena is the inanimate dative singular ending, could the opening and closing lines of the poem “u shefqmirena ...” be something like “in a blink” or something similar? It seems like the same kind of construction as “u tsalkena” for “in a moment.”

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Also, from clue 9 “zanon” appears to be some form of “fire,” which could relate to “zanel” from line 7 of the poem. Neither of these endings have been used or discussed previously though. Based on what we have already, -on could be animate singular accusative.

Outside of vocative, which this clearly isn’t, our only remaining options for singular are animate accusative and inanimate genitive. 

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Phew, haven't looked at this in a while! I was trying to make some sense of the last clue but my brain is fried. 😰

Just for reference: 

"Time is the fire in which we burn" - "Sermate va'umezhi u zanon vemi anirezhi."

I think 'semi' corresponds to 'we' (Nominative) and sermate to 'time'...

On 5/5/2019 at 7:29 AM, TheHunter said:

Also, from clue 9 “zanon” appears to be some form of “fire,” which could relate to “zanel” from line 7 of the poem. Neither of these endings have been used or discussed previously though. Based on what we have already, -on could be animate singular accusative.

Outside of vocative, which this clearly isn’t, our only remaining options for singular are animate accusative and inanimate genitive. 

So... if I got things right, the only dative we don't know for animate and inanimate nouns (excluding Proper) is the inanimate plural. If I got these right:

Animate Sing. = -ir // Animate Pl. = -eri // Inanimate Sing. = -ena

There's also 'Zana' in the poem, which technically would be nominative animate for fire unless it's a different word altogether (like art and beauty discussed earlier). But we already have those two datives, so I'm a little confused. It might be a different formation altogether rather than a straightforward 'fire we burn in'... I'm tempted to go for accusative as well! 

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